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2. 'Mortar rounds' hit market in Iraqi controlled east Mosul

  • Duration: 50
  • Channel: news
'Mortar rounds' hit market in Iraqi controlled east Mosul

Fire swept through an indoor market in east Mosul on Sunday after what witnesses described as mortar rounds hit several stalls. At least two people were killed and many others were injured in the busy Nabi Younis market. East Mosul was declared liberated by the Iraqi government earlier this year with locals resuming some normality of life after ISIL fighters were ousted. In west Mosul where the battle for control is still raging, it is unclear which side was responsible for possibly as many as 200 civilian deaths in an explosion a week ago. Initially a US-led coalition strike against so-called Islamic State snipers was said to have caused buildings to collapse in the Jadida district. However, Iraq’s military has cast doubt on that report claiming 61 bodies had been recovered and that explosive booby-traps set by the jihadists were responsible for the destruction of the buildings. The US said on Saturday (March 25) that it was investigating an air strike on March 17 at “the location corresponding to allegations of civilian casualties”. According to a monitoring group, nearly 700 civilians have died since the offensive in west Mosul began last month. Hundreds more are said to flee each day.


3. U. S. Investigating Mosul Strikes Said to Have Killed Up to 200 Civilians -

  • Duration: 181
  • Channel: news
U. S. Investigating Mosul Strikes Said to Have Killed Up to 200 Civilians -

U. S. Investigating Mosul Strikes Said to Have Killed Up to 200 Civilians - By TIM ARANGO and HELENE COOPERMARCH 24, 2017 BAGHDAD — The American-led military coalition in Iraq said Friday that it was investigating reports that scores of civilians — perhaps as many as 200, residents said — had been killed in recent American airstrikes in Mosul, the northern Iraqi city at the center of an offensive to drive out the Islamic State. And the reports of civilian deaths in Mosul came immediately after two recent incidents in Syria, where the coalition is also battling the Islamic State from the air, in which activists and local residents said dozens of civilians had been killed. But, he added, the recent spike in numbers “does suggest something has shifted.” American military officials said that what has shifted is that the Iraqi military, backed by the American-led coalition, is in the middle of its biggest fight so far — the battle to retake Mosul from the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL. “The repeated mistakes will make the mission to liberate Mosul from Daesh harder, and will push civilians still living under Daesh to be uncooperative with the security forces,” said Abdulsattar Alhabu, the mayor of Mosul, using the Arabic acronym for the Islamic State. Taken together, the surge of reported civilian deaths raised questions about whether once-strict rules of engagement meant to minimize civilian casualties were being relaxed under the Trump administration, which has vowed to fight the Islamic State more aggressively. Col. John J. Thomas, a spokesman for the United States Central Command, said that the military was seeking to determine whether the explosion in Mosul might have been prompted by an American or coalition airstrike, or was a bomb or booby trap placed by the Islamic State.


4. U.S. ‘Probably Had a Role’ in Mosul Deaths, Commander Says

  • Duration: 144
  • Channel: news
U.S. ‘Probably Had a Role’ in Mosul Deaths, Commander Says

U.S. ‘Probably Had a Role’ in Mosul Deaths, Commander Says Islamic State said that My initial assessment is that we probably had a role in these casualties, General Townsend did not describe the changes in detail, but cast them as a return to the military’s standard offensive doctrine following the "very centralized" approach he said was initially put in place after President Barack Obama sent American forces back to Iraq to combat the Islamic State. General Townsend said the steps were taken to speed up the process of providing airpower to support Iraqi troops and American Special Operations advisers at the leading edge of the offensive to recapture Mosul from the Islamic State. By MICHAEL R. GORDONMARCH 28, 2017 WASHINGTON — The senior United States commander in Iraq said Tuesday that an American airstrike likely triggered the collapse of a building in Mosul that killed more than 100 civilians this month, but indicated that an investigation would also examine whether the attack set off a larger blast from explosives set by militants. Maj. Gen. Maan al-Saadi, an Iraqi special forces commander, told The New York Times his men had called in the American airstrikes that caused the civilian deaths in Mosul. General Townsend said that he did not have information on the Iraqi officer’s specific role, but explained that any American airstrike requested by the Iraqis would also need to be approved by American forces.


5. US-led airstrikes on Daesh truck caused Mosul tragedy: Iraq

  • Duration: 268
  • Channel: news
US-led airstrikes on Daesh truck caused Mosul tragedy: Iraq

A senior Iraqi official has said that civilian deaths in last week’s Mosul tragedy were caused by a US-led coalition airstrike. Bashar al-Kiki, chairman of the Nineveh Provincial Council said the US-led attack targeted a nearby Daesh truck, laden with explosives. The US military has confirmed that its warplanes hit a location in western Mosul on March the 17th. The US Central Command said the airstrike was carried out at the request of Iraqi security forces. Iraq says it has opened a probe into the attack. The airstrike reportedly killed more than 200 Iraqi civilians.


6. In a Compromise, U.N. Rights Experts Will Examine Abuses in Yemen’s War

  • Duration: 168
  • Channel: news
In a Compromise, U.N. Rights Experts Will Examine Abuses in Yemen’s War

In a Compromise, U.N. Rights Experts Will Examine Abuses in Yemen’s War Earlier in September, Mr. al-Hussein, for the third year in a row, had urged creation of an international investigation panel as his office released a report presenting a litany of abuses by all parties involved in the conflict in Yemen, which has caused thousands of civilian casualties and contributed to a staggering humanitarian crisis in Yemen, the Arab world’s poorest country. Saudi coalition airstrikes were the leading cause of civilian casualties, Mr. al-Hussein noted, scolding "the reticence of the international community in demanding justice for the victims of the conflict." Saudi Arabia and its Arab allies called instead for the United Nations to provide international experts to support Yemen’s national commission — a position rejected by the other side because of that commission’s close relationship with the Saudis. 29, 2017 GENEVA — In a surprise compromise, the top United Nations human rights body decided on Friday to establish an international team of experts to examine abuses in the Yemen war and seek to identify those responsible. But compromise was harder to avoid this year, diplomats said, partly because of the deterioration of conditions in Yemen, now described as the world’s worst humanitarian crisis with seven million people verging on famine and a cholera epidemic that threatens to sicken nearly a million people by year’s end. Moreover, Yemen’s human rights commission, funded partly by Saudi Arabia, had proved unable in the last year to conduct comprehensive, impartial or transparent investigations, the United Nations said.


7. An airstrike killing civilians is murder

  • Duration: 340
  • Channel: news
An airstrike killing civilians is murder

The cruelty and methods of savagery employed by IS trouble Muslims before anyone else. It is obvious that an effort should be made to put an end to IS terror.  However, the U.S. is repeating the same error of the last 100 years and imagining that results can be achieved through airstrikes. Yet those airstrikes not only strengthen terror rather than finishing it off, but they are also a dangerous method that leads to considerable losses of civilian life. Murder can never be resolved by another murder: Killing even more people is not the way to stop deaths. Aerial bombardments are a form of mass punishment and harm everyone, all too often making no distinctions between civilians, killers, innocent people, women, children, the elderly and the sick. An airstrike is an inhumane method. Under democratic systems, even the most crazed killers are caught first and then brought to face justice and tried; in airstrikes,  finding them and determining their fault is considered unnecessary, let alone putting those murderers on trial.  Airstrikes kill dozens of people in an area in a single moment, and all in the name of punishing a single culprit and a good deal of the time the ‘criminal’ concerned is not even among those killed.  The commandment ‘Thou shalt not kill’ in the Torah and the Gospels also appears in the Qur’an. God tells Muslims that killing one person is equivalent to killing all mankind. Someone who sincerely believes and abides by the Qur’an will make the maximum effort to protect a single person’s life. Therefore, advocating aerial bombardments and espousing the idea that ‘There is nothing wrong with the accidental killing of one or two people in such operations,’ is not an attitude that could be employed by a Muslim. The path a Muslim must follow is that of an intellectual struggle, and the language he uses must be that of love alone. IS is a group with a polytheistic point of view that is incompatible with the Qur’an. They carry out persecution because of the incorrect beliefs they possess. Eliminating that wickedness can only be possible by correcting that false belief.  Only in that way can the savagery caused by IS be eliminated and the ideological foundation that attracts thousands of young people to radicalism be done away with. Insisting on airstrikes, when a rational and legitimate means of resolving the problem is otherwise available, will merely increase material and psychological losses. Buildings destroyed in bombings, damaged infrastructure and uninhabitable towns all represent a matchless opportunity for terrorist groups. No logical person should advocate giving terrorists such a gift by spending seven or eight  million dollars a day. To date, the U.S and other coalition forces have carried out more than 200 aerial assaults, but these attacks - costing millions of dollars - have not caused IS to withdraw in any meaningful fashion. On the contrary, the organization is still attempting to advance in Iraq and Syria. IS abandoned its bases shortly before the U.S. operations, and changed its habit of traveling in convoys. IS is thus protected from being hit. Targeting oil refineries and factories is not a deterrent to IS either, because these are not the only sources of revenue for IS. Consequently either the locations vacated by IS are bombed or factories, refineries, production zones are targeted in such a way as to paralyze the lives of the local people.   Bombing buildings that contain no IS elements and causing the deaths of civilians will clearly not put an end to IS. People who accept what they are indoctrinated with rather than thinking deeply for themselves must see this truth. Particularly for Muslims, it would be wrong to support such mass killing.  It must not be forgotten that our Prophet (saas) used methods of “discourse and explanation and calling to the truth” in his relations with the pagans of Mecca, who had made a tradition out of violence. He did not use weapons against them when he captured Mecca. He never thought along the lines of “Since these people are pagans, since these people are prone to violence, they must be destroyed en masse.” IS today acts on a pagan mindset; this pagan mindset can be changed by setting out the truth. Trying to deter people from using violence, making no distinction between those who are criminals and those who are not, those who are involved in terrorist activities and those who are not, when the aforementioned option  is available, will merely provoke further terror and nothing else.  Those who imagine that IS’s terrorism and extremism can be brought to heel by guns and bombs need to take a careful look back at what has happened to date during the Afghanistan operation. Far from putting an end to terror, military operations caused it to grow and ultimately gave rise to IS, who